Is Posting Covers on YouTube the BEST Use Of Your Time?

By Carlos Castillo

d lot of music biz teachers will tell you that you should commit time to releasing cover songs on YouTube because you’ll get all kinds of organic growth and attention.

This is a proven strategy that has been working for several years. But, especially now that so many musicians are applying it, I’m not sure it’s all that it’s cracked up to be anymore. And it’s not as simple as picking songs you like and recording your own versions.

It’s true that YouTube is the 2nd largest search engine. Which means that if you post songs that people are ALREADY looking for, you can show up in those searches. So your Lady Gaga covers might get some traction. But your Journey covers probably won’t.

In order to REALLY make that strategy work, what you have to do is cover POPULAR songs as soon as they are released. I’m talking the DAY they are released or within a few days at most.

Remember when Adele released “Hello” and everybody and their cousin covered it on YouTube?

The problem there is that you put yourself in a situation with a LOT of competition…

…AND you’re playing someone else’s songs.

So if your goal is to build an audience for your ORIGINAL music, before you put any more time into YouTube covers you should try something different.

Just trust me…

And follow my instructions exactly for a 7-day Facebook Live challenge.

Here are the rules:

Each day go on Facebook Live and play one of YOUR songs.

Don’t do it from your fan page. Do it from your personal profile. More people will see it that way.

Before you hit “Go Live” add a link to your squeeze page in the video description.

Mention 3 different calls-to-action during the broadcast:

1: “Please turn on my live notifications.”
2: “Please share this video or invite people to join.”
3: “Please subscribe to my email list.”

That’s it.

I promise that if you do that for 7 days in a row, you will not only get MORE subscribers and engagement out of it than your last attempt at a YouTube cover, you’ll do it playing your own songs.

For extra credit try it out on other platforms where you can broadcast live like: Periscope, Twitter, Instagram, & YouTube.

Not only will it help you identify which social media platforms are the most responsive for YOUR original music, you can also repurpose the videos as blog posts for your own website and put them into rotation as content that sends traffic there!


For more actionable advice, tips, and Musicpreneur wisdom, click here to join the Schwilly Family Musicians Community.

Carlos Castillo is a Musicpreneur, Artist Business Developer, International Road-Tripper, Lap Steel Player, and Captain of the Schwilly Family Musicians. Find him at Schwilly Family Musicians, or on Twitter at @CaptainSchwilly

Are You Guilty? 4 Ways Indie Artists Are Killing Social Media

[Editors Note: This post was written by Joshua Smotherman, co-founder of Middle Tennessee Music, and it originally appeared on the Cyber PR blog.]

 

In an ideal world I would wake up in the morning to a fresh cup of hot coffee. I would enjoy it as I check my e-mail and skim social networks to check up on friends and my favorite bands.

I would immerse myself in an online community of music lovers, songwriters, and musicians sharing, caring, and building with each other… NOT blasting commands to “check out my new hottest thing”.

I see enough billboards on the interstate.

In this world:

  • Bands would stop acting like rock stars and start acting like leaders
  • They would build self-sustaining tribes
  • They would listen to their fans
  • They would understand that growing organically will always win over view counts

As a music blogger, my inbox would NOT be full of one-liners and YouTube links I only see as distractions. Whatever happened to “connecting” with someone?

Unfortunately, this world does not exist. From where I’m sitting, the average indie band sucks at using social media and its ruining it for everyone else. Most importantly, your potential fans.

What are we doing wrong, you say?

Oh boy…where do I begin?

Me, Me, Me Marketing

You might have been raised in a world of billboards and commercials, but using social media as a one way street is killing your promo game.

It seems too many people are missing the social half of the phrase, social media.

You need to engage with fans and listeners instead of blasting them with links, videos, and nonsense about buying your album.

Sadly, most bands qualify [as what the marketing world refers to] as spammers.

Engaging is easier than you think and should come naturally (assuming you are not a recluse).

  • Share albums, videos, and news about other music you enjoy or local bands you play with. Ask others what they think.
  • Share news related to the music industry or issues that reflect the personality of your band and use them to engage in conversation.
  • Instead of posting links to the same videos and songs repeatedly, post clips of the band working in the studio or upload a demo mix and allow fans to share their opinions so you can take the art to another level. Involve fans in your process(es).
  • Network with bands in other areas to create an atmosphere for gig swapping and collaboration as well as cross promotion of content.

This list goes on but the takeaway here is engage in a way that results in feedback and interaction.

Build a community.

Focusing on the wrong metrics

Your follower count means nothing unless you see conversions.

Huh?!

More important than a follower, view, or like:

  • How many fans have signed up for your mailing list?
  • Do you pass around a mailing list signup sheet at your show?
  • How many people have you met at shows? (You do hang out with the audience after the show…right?)
  • How many people have bought a CD or t-shirt?

Stop putting all your energy into increasing numbers on social sites and focus on converting the followers you have into loyal fans.

Use social media to funnel music listeners to your website where you attempt to convert them into a mailing list signup, song download, or merchandise sale.

Would you rather have 1,000 likes or 100 fans spending $1,000 on music, merch, show tickets and crowd funding campaigns?

Show me the money!

Repeating yourself on every social network

Sending your Twitter feed to Facebook then copying and pasting it to Google+ so the same message appears on every site is a horrible idea.

So is auto play on audio embeds but that’s for a different time.

You are not expected to know marketing, you make music! Allow me to guide you on this train of thinking…

People who use Twitter are different than people who use Facebook and the people who use Google+ are not like the others.

It is imperative you consider these facts when developing a social media strategy and act accordingly.

Make sure you actually use social media as a music fan before deciding how to market your music using these tools. Follow bands who are in a position you would like to be in and see how they use each network. Notice what works, what doesn’t work, and then perfect your plan of action.

Posting several updates to Twitter every hour (depending on the nature of the updates) is more acceptable than posting to Facebook every 15 minutes.

When you over saturate a person’s FB News Feed, they hide you from their feed. Or worse…unlike your page or mark your posts as spam.

A general guideline is try to retweet, reply, comment, and share relevant content from others more than you broadcast and peddle your own wares.

Sell Without Selling

If you focus on building a community around your band instead of acting as a bulletin board, you will start noticing the true power of social media.

You will not see overnight results.

The key is to stay consistent, focus on creating great music, and communicate directly with your audience.

If you create a community of loyal fans, they will want to support you.

Your community will become your sales force and all you need to do is be yourself and continue giving fans a band worth loving.

Consistency allows you to reach a tipping point where fans begin promoting your music for you by wearing t-shirts, playing CDs at parties, and recommending you to their friends.

It is hard to conceive this when you are starting at zero, but 6 to 12 months down the road you will notice things happening simply because you remained persistent.

While fans are busy promoting your music, you need to seek out gig opportunities, blog reviews or interviews, and other chances to put yourself in the presence of tastemakers who can expose you to their audience.

Bloggers, journalists, booking agents, and other industry personnel will not give you their attention unless you have proof of a loyal, engaged following.

Buying followers or views might help you manipulate chart rankings and other metrics, but they will never replace the power of community. If you have 5,000 page likes but no one is liking, sharing, or commenting on your updates; we all see right through you.

So can the people who can expose you to bigger audiences of music fans.

In closing:

  • Build your tribe
  • Nurture your community
  • Stop acting like a corporate sales machine

You might also be interested in this panel discussion concerning Marketing, PR, and Promotion on a Budget hosted by Indie Connect NYC which discusses mores things indie musicians are doing wrong online.

How Have You Avoided Killing Social Media?

Let us know below what you have done to overcome these four social media killers above (or any others that you’ve experienced) in the form of a comment below!

Utilizing Soundcloud to Drive iTunes Sales

[Editor’s Note: This blog was written by Janelle Rogers, the founder of  Green Light Go Publicity, a music PR firm which helps up-and-coming musicians reach their audience.]

 

There’s no doubt that convincing fans and music listeners to buy music in 2017 can be an uphill battle. For nearly 20 years the music consumer has been conditioned into downloading music for free. Services like Spotify, Pandora and Soundcloud have made it even easier, while making it legal.

You may think the only way to get your music heard is to give it all away for free.

Not so fast.

Like any legitimate business model, you should be looking at how you can market your product to drive sales. A single can be your product to market while iTunes provides the vehicle to drive sales.

How do you do that? Let’s dive into a simple five step strategy to market your music on Soundcloud to drive sales on iTunes.

1. Create a Sales Goal

Before you start marketing your music, you should set a realistic sales goal of what you hope to achieve. Note, I said realistic. If you only have 30 Soundcloud followers and 100 Facebook followers, chances of you selling 1,000 downloads of your album on iTunes within two months are fairly unrealistic. In that case you need to make a compromise, either extend the timeline to where you can realistically sell 1,000 downloads or decrease the amount of sales to reflect your current followers.

2. Offer a Track for Free

If you want people to buy your music, you need to give them a sample of your music to try out. It’s the equivalent of going to your local market, trying that new crunchy snack at the sample table and then buying the entire bag because you can’t get enough.

Determine one single you can give for free off your new album and set a limited time frame to download it. You’re offering a single for a limited time for three reasons. It allows listeners a chance to really hear your music and decide if they want to hear more. The limited time creates incentive to download before it goes away and it keeps fans from solely relying on free music.

Lastly, by only offering one single it gives incentive to purchase more music if they are interested or at the very least streaming from Spotify where you’ll be paid for each listen. If you were to give away your entire album, you’re essentially giving away the entire bag of chips without asking for anything in return.

3. Post iTunes Pre-sale or Sale Link

Next, you need to make it easy for fans to know where to buy your music on iTunes. Post your iTunes pre-sale link or sale link on your Soundcloud profile, any public tracks from the album, and your Facebook and Twitter profiles. You should also include the release date so fans know when it’s available.

4. Alert Soundcloud Followers of New Music

Soundcloud made notification changes in 2014, which make it difficult to communicate when you have a new song available. In the past, when you uploaded a song, your followers would receive an email notification with a link to the new song. Currently, Soundcloud offers no bulk email notification option to alert fans of new music. Without your fans receiving notifications of your new music, what can you do?

First, you’ll unfortunately have to take the time to privately Soundcloud message every follower on your list individually to notify them of a new song available. That’s the good news if you only have 37 fans. It’s very bad news, if you have 10,000. This would be a very time intensive process if you did this every time you released a new single. You need a notification process that is both efficient and in your control. The best way to do this is to also notify your Soundcloud followers of your email list with a direct link to sign up and receive notifications when you release new music.

If you don’t have an email list, that should be your first priority for two reasons. One, you control how your fans are notified and you also don’t risk losing fan contacts on a platform who owns the contact information or controls how information can be sent.

Lastly, keeping your iTunes objective in mind, you should also include that iTunes pre-sale link and call to action in your individual messages and newsletter announcements.

5. Increase Soundcloud Following to Increase Sales

In order to increase sales outside of your base, you also need to increase your following. The best way to utilize this within Soundcloud is to follow those who would be interested in your music and are current Soundcloud users. If you also factor in users who repost tracks regularly, no more than 2-3 times daily, you have the opportunity to grow your base exponentially.

First, think about bands who are similar to you on Soundcloud and follow them. Then take a look at their followers and start following those who fit the parameters in the above paragraph. Soundcloud does limit how many you can follow in one day, so I recommend keeping it to ten per day, which will also make it more manageable as you engage with those who follow you and comment on your tracks.

This brings me to engagement. You should also be engaging with those you follow or who follow you, by liking tracks they post (If you like them) and commenting. This is especially true if you are following a band or someone else in the music industry.

This is also the one area where I suggest NOT sending your iTunes link, keeping in mind you should have it included in your song description. You are building a fan relationship when increasing listeners so you need to make sure the listener experience is a good one. Once you have built that relationship, then you can repeat the above process by releasing another single to support the album and including the iTunes link when you privately message.

This method is the first step in increasing sales for your music. In this day and age, however, you need to be creative and adapt to a constantly changing industry. Album sales are just a portion of revenue for a band. You should always look at how you can build your audience and create an experience they want to be part of, so they will in turn support your every endeavor.

Top 10 Keys to Success For Independent Hip Hop Artists

[Editors NoteThis blog was written by Hao Nguyen and it originally appeared on Stop The Breaks, a digital marketing and promotion platform focused on showcasing independent hip-hop artists.]

The independent route is a tough, long grind, no doubt about it.

People look at the top independent hip hop artists in the game today like Tech N9ne, Nipsey Hussle and Currensy and see how they’re balling out of control, but they don’t understand just how much work these artists put into building their lifestyle.

Tech and his business partner Travis O’Guin have been building Strange Music, Inc. from the ground up for close to 20 years. Nipsey got dropped by Epic Records before starting his independent grind. Spitta was hustling and learning about the rap game from No Limit and Cash Money since 2002.

It’s never easy and takes a special type of person to succeed in the independent music industry. Someone who has the entrepreneurial spirit combined with the gritty fortitude to keep going no matter how hard it gets.

As a digital platform focused on showcasing independent hip-hop artists from all over the world, Stop The Breaks has had the opportunity to talk with hundreds of artists about their grind and really get an understanding of what creates success in this industry.

Here are our top 10 keys to success for independent artists. Or as Future would put it “I got the keys, the keys, the keys.”

1. Understand effective marketing

In its simplest form, marketing is raising the profile of a brand and its products or services in the public’s mind. So in that case, I would say all independent artists understand the basics of marketing their music – yes, even those rappers spamming SoundCloud links are doing some form of marketing.

But notice that I wrote “understand effective marketing,” which makes all the difference in the world between success and failure.

You can market your music by hitting up everyone on your Twitter feed with a link to your new single, or, you can effectively market your music by creating a solid marketing strategy and executing it regularly.

2. Relentless work ethic

There’s a saying: “Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.” You’re not going to be successful at anything in this world without hard work and dedication, shout out to Money Mayweather.

Look at all our case studies on successful artists – whether it’s superstars like Kanye West and Drake or independent grinders like Yo Gotti – and the one constant factor is that they put in the long hours above everything else.

How do you think Curren$y drops some many projects in one year (8 so far in 2016 and counting)? How do you think Gucci manages to flood the streets even when locked up? How do you think Fetty Wap scored a number one album and five top 40 hit singles?

It’s all about hard work guys. But not just about the music.

In addition to putting in the long hours working on your craft; you also have to put in the hours distributing and promoting the music, fine-tuning your live performances, engaging with fans online and offline, and constantly educating yourself on the business side of things.

Which brings us to…

3. Music industry knowledge

Like Rap Coalition founder and music industry veteran, Wendy Day, said: “I think the most important trait is seeking out the knowledge and experience to do this properly. You either hire the right people who have the knowledge and connections to help you succeed as an artist or you learn how to do this yourself.”

Educating yourself thoroughly on the music business will make a huge difference in your success as an artist. Make sure you understand the fundamentals of music publishing and licensing your content, especially if you’re looking to set up your own independent record label.

4. Strong team around you

To Wendy’s point above, if you don’t have the experience or time to learn about the music business, then you need to make sure you build yourself a strong team to address your weaknesses.

Just because you’re an independent artist doesn’t mean you have to do everything alone. There are only so many hours in the day and you have to be smart on which tasks you dedicate your time to and which tasks you delegate.

Depending on what you’re missing in your arsenal, consider hiring a manager, marketing director or promoter, tour manager, graphic designer, lawyer and accountant. It doesn’t have to be right away, but you should definitely have a plan to slowly build up your team as you hit new levels in your recording career.

5. Effective social media presence

How many rappers do you know who are really active on Twitter or Facebook, but all they’re doing is spamming their followers with music links? There’s no genuine engagement with fans, no real interaction with followers, just blindly spamming link after link hoping they’re going to be the next big thing.

Don’t do this. Trust me, it’ll do more harm than good.

It’s good to be active on as many social media networks as possible, but only if you can manage them properly and engage with the fans regularly, otherwise don’t spread yourself too thin. It’s better to be active and effective on 3 platforms, rather than on all them and not using them properly.

6. Produce regular content for fans

We’re currently living in a super connected world where consumers are conditioned for instant gratification and trained to get everything, right away. As an artist, you have to try your best to fulfill these consumer needs.

There are only a few major artists out there who can get away with disappearing for months on end and coming back to commercial success. Kanye, Eminem, Drake and Kendrick, just to name a few.

Everybody else needs to be continually creating and distributing content to stay in touch with fans. When I say content, I don’t just mean music. It can be social media updates, email newsletters, tour videos, blog posts, guest articles, whatever you need to engage with your fans.

7. Investing in building their brand

Investing the time and money to build up your brand now is the most important thing you can do for a long-term career in the rap game. Other artists can copy your ideas, fashion, music, and believe me, they will. The only thing they can’t copy is your brand.

Think about the most successful independent artists in the game and how they communicate their brand to their fans. Currensy has his Jet Life movement, Tech N9ne with his insane live shows and Technicians following, Chance The Rapper and his positive, Chicago music.

Everything you put out contributes to building your brand, whether it’s positive or negative. Your new logo has just as much impact on your overall brand as how you perform on tour. It’s a long term investment but it’ll definitely pay dividends if you put in the effort now.

8. Focused promotion campaigns

Marketing is your overall strategy of raising awareness of your music and brand to your target audience; promotion campaigns are more tactical and focused.

For example, releasing an album would be one promo campaign. To ensure you get the most out of your promotion budget, your campaigns need to be planned out and precise. Consider the best distribution channels for this project – will it be online, offline or both? Which platform will you be using – Bandcamp, SoundCloud, iTunes, etc.?

Which publications and blogs are you going to be targeting? It’s better to pick out 10 to 15 to send out personalized press releases rather than spamming 1,000 people with a generic message.

Once you have everything in order, hit the launch button.

9. High quality product

Let’s keep this one short and sweet. To be a successful independent hip-hop artist, you need to have dope music. I don’t mean Grammy-award winning, critically acclaimed music – I just mean music that will build you a fanbase. You need to make music that people want to listen to, otherwise, it’s not going to work, period.

10. Create realistic goals

Being ambitious is one thing, having realistic goals is another. It’s great if you have ambitions to be the biggest rapper in the world, making the most money, winning awards, selling out stadiums, but having pragmatic, achievable goals is a much better way to approach your recording career.

Let’s take a look at J. Cole. He went from posting songs online to standing outside JAY Z’s building, wanting to produce for the legend. Cole dropped mixtape after mixtape and it was only after Hov heard “Lights Please” that he decided to sign the rapper to Roc Nation.

From there, he released a number one album, went platinum just last year, and is now selling out stadiums across the world with his very own HBO documentary and record label, Dreamville Records, financed by Interscope.

Having goals is the best way to not drive yourself crazy, thinking that your career is going nowhere. Start off small – e.g. you want to perform in front of 25 people for the first time in your career, you want to drop a mixtape, you want to collaborate with an artist you like, etc.

Create a list of realistic, achievable goals, then tick them off as you accomplish them. Keep grinding, keep working, keep putting out dope product, keep engaging with your fans and your dreams will come.

Local Publicity: How To Maximize Events & Releases in Your Own Backyard

[Editors Note: This is a guest blog written by Fiona Bloom, publicist and founder of The Bloom EffectPrior to running her own business, Fiona has overseen many careers including her time at EMI Records where she ran marketing campaigns for Digable Planets,  Gang Starr, Shara Nelson, The Solsonics, Eternal and others.]

Artists are so concerned with the big picture that more often then not, they lose sight of the importance of acclaim in their own backyard. How could you possibly think you’ll conquer the world before conquering your town?

The great thing about local promotion is that you really get to tap into your community, build real fans, get into the trenches guerrilla style and network in the most genuine ways possible!

A long time ago in ancient history – well, the 90’s -every record company had a street marketing department, and there were street team companies being hired independently. In fact, my first gig ever in New York was overseeing the street promo at EMI/Chrysalis.

Are you ready to undertake the responsibility of getting visibility, building buzz, securing local media and having fun whilst doing it? Here’s how…

Get started early

So, you have a show coming up. First off, you need to make sure you have enough lead time to work the market. Keep in mind there’s a few mediums to work with. Print usually requires at least three to four weeks advance. For digital/new media, you can get away with two weeks advance.

Social media operates in real time, so while that can be instantaneous, it also needs some strategy behind it leading to the day of.

Radio needs about two weeks, and TV can be two to three weeks advance. It also depends on how much traction the event already has. Is there a big name attached to it? Or how about a sponsor? How many folks on your team?

Get visual with it

In this day when promoting, visuals are just as important as the music. A web flyer and print flyer are worth it if you can afford the investment. Your web flyer should be high-res (300 DPI) and should be captivating – a nice image and clean font and text with the who, what, and where:

– Line Up
– Date/Time
– Ticket Price
– Venue Name/Address
– Ticket Link
– Partner logos
– Social Media URLS (you can create hyper links)

Hit all corners

I consider ‘local publicity’ now to be all-inclusive, meaning:

MediaTV, Radio, Social, Print, Digital and Mobile
Street MarketingI still believe that physical flyers can make a difference and play a role in your success with getting the word out. It’s always good to identify a few drop-off locations, too, which would include record stores, the venue your show is at, tattoo shops, and other lifestyle outlets; and don’t forget about he library, and coffee shops.
SNIPES/PostersThese cost a little more to manufacture and therefore you don’t need as many. 25-50 maximum will probably do, but please be careful if you’re going around the town stapling your SNIPES/posters to lamp posts, railings, trees, boards – you can get fined and that’s expensive!
Club PromotionIf it’s a single or album, you can hit the clubs – promotion managers and DJs – they love vinyl, too.

The great thing about these ‘Best Practices’ in your market is that they can be applied to each city you play in.

So whether it’s a show or a video or an album you’re promoting, just make sure the visual/packaging matches your product and that it’s as clear and concise as possible.

Research your market

Print

For print, find all your local outlets (daily papers, weekly’s, monthlys, glossys, college papers, bi-weeklys) and their respective web sites (digital). Make sure that if you’re a hip hop act that you’re not sending to a paper that just covers rock or alternative. Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone and call them – the receptionist or operator can patch you through, or often times will give you the name of their music editor and email address.

You can also ask the venue that booked your show. They have their own media lists and are usually very happy to share these as it’s mutually beneficial.

I used to spend hours at Barnes and Noble before the internet and the advent of social media, going through tons of titles and looking at mastheads – writing that stuff down and of course buying a few ‘zines too so I was patronizing. You don’t need to do that anymore – it’s much more time efficient and effective now and it’s all there at your fingertips! Just don’t be lazy: do the work. You have to start somewhere.

You can also build your list and database from scratch. I did. Yes I may be into this 20 years but my rolodex/database is now 20,000 strong. That’s my bloodline, my livelihood and sure enough, my value. You’d have to pay me a sh*t load of money to sell it! Although, your lists are only as good as your relationships. Relationships are built over time, but the beauty about today’s world is that as long as your pitch (phone, in-person and/or email) is compelling, clear in message, and your follow through is impeccable, you’ll get responses the first or second time around. It’s presentation and delivery!

local publicity

Make sure you service the music and entertainment editors, calendar editors, nightlife and music and features editors with a press release, publicity photo, the flyer and a short email; then follow up at least three or four or more times, depending on how soon you hear from them. Invite them to your show, (make sure you offer them guest list access if they’re interested in covering), and make sure to fulfill their request whether it’s a photo pass, back stage interview, live review and/or video cameras – those need to be pre-approved.

Your main goals for these outlets: ‘Preview’, ‘Calendar Pick’, ‘Best Bet’, ‘Item’, ‘Blurb with Photo’, ‘Feature/Interview’ and ‘Live Review’.

Radio

When pursuing radio locally, you have college/community, commercial, public, internet, satellite, and pirate stations to target. Again – do your research. There’s local market radio lists you can get on the internet and, in the case of an event, the venue will be able to share. You can also look at CMJ’s radio charts, Billboard, and other trade magazines.

You can send them music and offer ticket giveaways and artist interviews – at the college level they’re usually receptive to this if the time slot/DJ happens to play music that’s similar in style. Make friends with the DJs. They can champion your music and artistry and in turn bring loads of fans to your brand!

local publicity

Internet – Blogs and New Media

Each market bloggers. There’s even micro-blogging, which is the likes of Tumblr, Reddit, and personal websites. Take advantage of all the tools and features you have at your disposal.

Know your audience here, too. Know that a blogger is often younger and doesn’t blog full-time, therefore they don’t have hours each day to update and there may be a delay getting back to you. Also in some cases they don’t want to necessarily be pitched — some bloggers prefer to discover on their own so you can ‘gently’ send them some music and mention the release and/or the show without it being a hard sell or push.

It should be easy, clean, short and to-the-point with all the links available on the email. No attachments and preferably photos should be available via Dropbox, WeTransfer, Hightail or other file sharing mechanism. Music should be shared the same way if they want a download or streaming link (Spotify, Dropbox, Soundcloud, YouTube, Bandcamp etc.).

There are event sites out there like Eventful, Fusicology, BandsinTown, Facebook, Meetup, Eventbrite, Yelp, and others. They all have ‘Submit’ buttons.

local publicity

TV

Depending on the reach and clout of a network, the main networks will be especially interested if there’s a charity angle, recognizable name or unusual hook/novelty. Targeting cable and video shows is the way to go. Once more: do the research. Every market has at least five cable and video outlets. You can pitch a live video session, interview and/or performance on a morning segment or other program. Send a short email, include links and practice lots of follow up. You can go their social handles and reach out there, and the phone is always suggested.

When you’re dealing with all these mediums and making contacts and building relationships, be as cordial, polite, concise, informative and engaging as you can – the more passion resonated, the better it’s received, and you’ll be amazed at the results.

Connecting with local fans

So now you’ve done your street marketing, reached out to radio, hit up print outlets, blogs, TV outlets, and event sites. Here comes the very fun part: engaging with your existing fans and reaching new ones via your social media platforms.

All artists be utilizing social media channels like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, SnapChat, and Instagram to tap into their communities. You can do targeted Facebook posts via paid ‘boosting’ and or running an ad campaign in your area. Make sure also to follow local venues on all their socials and interact on each.

Follow some of the brands and users they’re already following. Subscribe and leave comments on YouTube videos, and of course all whilst telling them about your upcoming event or release – you can add the link but in a friendly and open manner. Remember, it’s not a one-way street or about ‘Self Promotion’ on social media — it’s a dialogue. Think about reciprocity, giving back and being alive and vibrant! It’s called ‘social’ media for a reason.

local publicity

Hashtagging works best on Instagram and Twitter. Try to use generic and a clever tag that nobody’s used. With Snapchat, you can create a whole storyboard of fun, clever, creative ways to get folks to pay attention and come see you live or meet you in person.

It’s amazing what you can do with SMS and messaging apps. You can send flyer visuals and nice short texts to friends in the area.

At the end of the day, everyone is looking to achieve the same thing: get as many eyeballs and ears to their music and art, and get as many of their fans to their shows! It’s not rocket science, but it does take a lot of effort and hustle. Please enjoy these steps, as I promise it will be less tedious, more faster-moving and you’ll actually be very happy with the results.