Personality Dynamics: Why Communication and Respect Are Vital For The Health of Your Band

[Editors Note: This article was written by Patrick McGuire.]

 

Many serious bands happily sacrifice money, relationships and careers in the hopes that they’ll find an audience for their music. But while focusing on the musical parts of being in a band is important, the way the musicians who form a band respect and communicate with each other is just as vital for acts that hope to create, record and perform music over the long-term.

Bands break up for all sorts of reasons. Some musicians throw everything they have into music for a few years only to give it all up when they can’t find the success they’d hoped for, but others upend otherwise perfectly good projects because they simply can’t work with the other musicians in their band anymore. It’s become routine for bands with massive talent and untapped potential to call it quits because they fail to focus their efforts on communication and mutual respect.

What Bands Do and Don’t Do Well

When musicians set out to create new projects, they probably think about making music and not much else, and this makes sense. If the purpose of a band is to create music, it should exclusively focus on writing, recording and performing, right?

Bands obviously need to spend time developing their identity as musicians, but alongside non-musical relationship skills like communication, openness and respect. Musicians in newer bands with plenty of enthusiasm and energy tend to be great at writing lots of songs and playing shows, but they’re notoriously bad at making goals, being open about feelings and speaking up when they feel unheard or disrespected.

Blame it on the male-driven culture behind so many bands out there or the fact that making serious music requires musicians to frequently enter vulnerable territories they’re not usually comfortable in, but most bands are simply not great at being open with how they feel about things, and this is a big problem.

All Relationships Take Work. Why Would Your Band Be Any Different?

Whether you realize it or not, a band is a relationship unlike any other. Falling somewhere between a friendship, marriage and creative business partnership, the personality dynamic behind every band is completely unique. But like all other relationships, it takes effort and sacrifice to keep a band healthy and together.

The work that makes the other relationships in your life possible is similar to the work you’ll need to do to keep your band healthy and on track. Some bands, most famously Metallica, even go as far as to get professional counseling for their issues. Your band might not need therapy, but you will have to learn to speak openly and respectfully to each other if you want to stay together.

Opening the Lines of Communication

It can be awkward and unnatural for some musicians to open up and talk about their needs and feelings, but for bands to be successful, they have to be able to really talk and listen to each other. Communication in band settings is so vital because making music with other people is complicated on every level and there’s often so much at stake.

Bands routinely deal with everything from complicated finances and contracts to spending months together touring crammed together in a small van or car. Sure, at band practice once a week you’ll be able to stay quiet and let some things you’re not happy with slide, but when you’re on tour for two months promoting an album you’ve just put a couple thousand of your own dollars into, it might be a little harder to hold your tongue. Opening up the lines of communication now will keep you from saying things you might regret later.

Respect, Openness and Empathy

Musicians in successful bands find ways to respect and empathize with each other, even when it’s not easy to. Under ideal conditions, it doesn’t take a lot of work for some like-minded musicians to be kind and patient with one another, but like in any other relationship, people show their true colors in the face of real challenges.

Who you are when the van breaks down or when your band blows the show? It’s more important for that person to be kind, open and respectful to your other bandmates than the person you are when things are going swimmingly. Easier said than done, of course, but the effort here is the important thing.

Taking Stock of the Health of Your Band

It can be uncomfortable to address underlying issues in your band, but ignoring them will only make things worse. Setting aside time after rehearsals is a good way to make time for getting things off your chest, making plans and opening up a dialogue about what your band is doing and where you want to go.

Rather than waiting for disasters to appear and become unmanageable, getting in the habit of creating opportunities for respectful dialogue now will help your band stay together and make music for years to come.


Patrick McGuire is a writer, composer, and experienced touring musician based in Philadelphia.

Wednesday Video Diversion: October 11, 2017

Happy Wednesday everyone. Time to divert your attention from whatever it was you were up to before reading this entry to kick back, relax, and enjoy some awesome music videos from our ever-growing community of TuneCore Artists. What are we celebrating this week? Well, did you know that on this day just a few years back in 2009, Barbra Streisand went to #1  on the U.S. album charts with Love Is The Answer? Yeah, that doesn’t seem like anything worth mentioning, until you realize that she’s the ONLY artist to have a number one album in the States in FIVE different decades. That’s why Barbra’s the queen!

Sharon Needles, “Battle Axe”


Lucy Cavalier, “Put You Down”


Rob $tone, “Holy Grail (feat. Malik Burgers)”


Tetrarch, “Oddity”


Robbie Williams, “Go Mental (feat. Big Narstie & Atlantic Horns)”


The Ace Family, “You’re My Ace”


Kado Barlatier, “Komplete Strangers”


Falling Through April, “Desperate Measures”


Trenton, “Ghost Runner”

6 Things You Can Do To Get Your Fans to Take More Photos At Your Shows (And Why That Matters)

[Editors Note: This blog post was written by Hugh McIntyreHugh writes about music and the music industry and regularly contributes to Forbes, Sonicbids, and more.]

These days, everybody is taking photos…of everything. Now that cameras are everywhere and anyone can upload their latest capture to the world wide web in mere seconds, there is no stopping the deluge of images that continues to grow larger and larger by the hour. Some musicians are upset about this, as it distracts them when they are performing and they feel audiences aren’t paying the sort of attention they want, but none of that is going to stop how people act nowadays, so why not make the most of it?

As a working musician in a social media-focused world, you should always be on the hunt for great content. You will find yourself constantly needing something to post or to save for another day, and snaps from a concert can be the perfect filler. If you’re in the beginning stages of your career, keeping a photographer with you at all times (especially when touring) probably isn’t an option, so why not rely on your fans to supply you with the pics you’ve been looking for?

Here are a few ways to get your fans to take more photos of (and with) you, and then to share them in a way you can find them easily and repost them…with their permission and proper crediting, of course.

1. Pose!

Young people these days don’t always need to be told to take a photo—it’s in their nature by now. Most under the age of, say, 30, have extensive experience with smartphones, and the vast majority of them have become used to taking photos of almost everything in their day-to-day lives. This is the generation that has had to think of everything in terms of content, be it for Facebook, Twitter, or especially Instagram, and they have a mind for this sort of thing. If you do something fairly obvious that says “take my picture!,” chances are they will understand the message in no time.

Pose for a moment on stage, stop moving for a minute or so, put the spotlight on just you, stand with your bandmates before taking a bow at the end of the night…you can be as creative as you want with this idea, but it’s really, really easy, and you may be surprised how popular those few seconds will be in the photos you search for later.

2. Make A Special Moment

Every concert and every performance should be fun and special in its own way, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t go out of your way to do something extra during at least some of your shows. What this might be differs for every band or artist and it should vary by staging, but if you do it right, you could wind up with plenty of photos and perhaps even some press.

Shoot confetti out of cannons, bring a fan up onstage and sing to them, gather two fans together and arrange a marriage proposal (this is always a crowd pleaser), use a funny prop during one of the songs, or bring out a special guest that those in the crowd might recognize, if that’s possible. Any one of these would likely end up being the highlight of that particular performance, and it just begs everybody in attendance to whip out their cameras.

3. Create a Photo Booth

This option might not yield any photos of you and your bandmates doing what you do best (performing), but it can supply you all with a different kind of picture, which can wind up being useful in its own way.

Work with the venue before you arrive to set up some sort of area specifically designed for photos. This can be a “photobooth” of sorts (though you might not want to shell out the money to rent an actual photobooth just yet), or perhaps something as simple as a backdrop. You don’t need to spend a lot of money to make this a reality, though it might cost your band a few dollars to have something printed with your band’s logo all across it, like what red carpets are lined with. If you’re meeting fans afterward, why not make sure to do so exactly where you want to, with this added bonus? It might help push a new song or album, or maybe just a hashtag you are trying to promote.

4. Suggest A Hashtag

Speaking of a hashtag, that is something else that younger music lovers are already familiar with, and once you’ve given it to them, they know exactly what to do with it (usually). You can print the hashtag, which should be easy to understand, make sense, and be as short as possible, and people will see it. Show flyers, event reminders online, and perhaps even posters placed throughout the venue can all feature the phrase, and you can even mention it while performing, but don’t be annoying here, because while most young people don’t mind being asked and reminded about a hashtag, especially if there is any incentive to go tweet it or Instagram it, they can very quickly become a nuisance, and once that has happened, nobody wants to be a part of the movement.

5. Post On Social Media

Since you are looking for pictures to share on social media later on, why not use the medium to influence more fans to start taking pictures in the first place? Start posting on your accounts telling everybody flat out that you are on the hunt for some really excellent snaps. This will let those who catch the missives know to go out of their way to do so when they are at your next show, and you never know what pics are already out there sitting on phones or in folders on computers, just waiting to be unearthed by those who are into your music who might not have realized anybody was interested in their digital souvenirs.

Also, once you begin posting pictures shot by concert attendees and tagging them (and thanking them in your tweet), it won’t take long for people to get the idea and start sharing openly. Who doesn’t want a little recognition for a well-framed picture and a thank you from a musician or band they like?

6. Ask Them

If all else fails, or if you’re feeling particularly lazy—or perhaps if you just want to be direct and honest with your fans—why not just ask them to take some photos and share them? While you’re on stage and chatting in between songs (if that’s your thing, which isn’t the case with every artist), casually mention that you love seeing pictures from your shows on social media.

You don’t need to beg or plead, and please don’t be obnoxious about it (nothing is worse than someone bugging you to snap an excessive number of pics of them), but if you’re doing a good job and entertaining those who paid to see you, and since some of them will already be taking photos on their phones anyway, nudge the rest of the audience to do the same, and you may be surprised to see how many come flowing in over the next few days.

New Music Friday: August 4, 2017

TuneCore Artists are releasing tons of new music every day. Each week we check out the new TuneCore releases and choose a few at random to feature on the blog.

Is your hit next?

Follow The Billion Dollar Club – a Spotify playlist that’s updated every Friday with new releases from TuneCore Artists – stream it below!


We Should Go To Counseling
Quiet Company

Rock, Alternative


Blend Out
Uri Grey

Pop, Electronic


Dreamcatcher
Geneva White

Pop, R&B/Soul


Doom Side of the Moon
Doom Side of the Moon

Rock, Heavy Metal


Tell Me True
Corey Chisel & Adriel Denae

Folk


Out Of Light
Slushii

Dance, Electronic


The Maranda Experience Volume I
Maranda Curtis

Christian/Gospel


Paving the Runway (You’re Gonna Fly)
JJ Heller

Singer/Songwriter, Children’s Music


Shady
Visto

Hip Hop/Rap, R&B/Soul


Softer Side
Erica Blinn

Rock, Alternative


Missing London
Lostboycrow

Pop, R&B/Soul


Album II: Grasp of the Undying
Pentakill

Heavy Metal, Rock


Crystalline
Jome

Pop, Alternative


Enough
Janoskians

Alternative, Pop


Faces
MyKey

Singer/Songwriter, Pop

Wednesday Video Diversion: July 26, 2017

In need of a little mid-week inspiration? This day in 1968, a group known as The Jackson Five signed a one-year contract with Motown Records – they’d go on to have not one, not two, but FOUR number one singles in the next two years. Wait – you said you’re looking for a little mid-week distraction? Oh – well check out these awesome TuneCore Artist music videos and drift awaaaaay:

Doom Side of the Moon, “Money”


Alice Kristiansen, “Lost In Translation”


The Babe Rainbow, “Love Forever”


LDF (Ladies Drink Free), “FREAKSONIC”


Dumb Blondes, “Into the Light”


Trey Jordan, “Invest (feat. Double O-Z)”


Capital Kings, “I Can’t Quit (feat. Reconcile)”


Roberto, “Into You”


Passenger, “Angie (Rolling Stones Cover)”

Bright City, “You Are the One Thing”

TuneCore Artists Close In On Earning One Billion Dollars In Revenue

When TuneCore launched in 2006, our mission was simple and clear: to help independent artists sell their music online, without sacrificing sales revenue or giving up their rights. At that time, there was only a fraction of the digital platforms by which artists can have their music streamed, downloaded and discovered in 2017. iTunes ruled, Amazon was cracking into the market, and artists that created music outside of the label system needed a way to get it distributed.

Since then, TuneCore has gone on to grow as a company exponentially in terms of what we offer artists in the way of features and services – and independent artists have acquired more and more power when it comes to controlling and advancing their careers. Services like Music Publishing Administration, Fan Reviews, Professional Mastering, YouTube Sound Recording revenue collection and others have made TuneCore a staple in the indie community across all genres.

All the while, whether they continued grinding it out DIY-style, got signed to a label, or achieved mainstream success, TuneCore Artists carried on receiving 100% of their sales revenue using our platform.

Today, we’re excited to announce that TuneCore is approaching the $1 BILLION mark of revenue earned by artists from their download sales and streams!

That’s one billion as in the number one, and NINE zeros after it. These are McDonald’s-esque numbers, people. Dr. Evil-from-Austin-Powers-ransom-request numbers, even. No matter the non-music-related monetary figure reference: we think it’s a pretty big deal.

Collectively, that money helped artists do things like:

  • Eat
  • Pay rent
  • Record more projects
  • Create and sell merch
  • Sign up for Publishing Administration
  • Build PR and radio campaign plans
  • Afford new equipment and gear
  • Go on tour

Maybe you’re reading this as a TuneCore Artist who just joined or hasn’t seen tons of money from their release since distributing and you’re thinking, “Wait, what? Me?” Yes, you. As you hustle and write and record and tour to build a fanbase, and focus on earning more revenue from your music, the money you’ve earned so far – whether you’re still working on that first dollar, or you’ve out the other side as a superstar – contributes to a major figure that would have baffled music industry pundits over ten years ago.

Your contribution to this major milestone, no matter what the size, plays an undeniable role in the further expansion of independent music and supports the idea that artists can do it their way and still get paid.

To celebrate, for a limited time you can join the Tunecore Artists already in the ‘Billion Dollar Club’ by distributing a FREE SINGLE using the promo code BILLION at check out (offer expires 7/2/17).

Distribute your free single today!

As we count down to the big earning moment, join us for the journey by following us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram where you can get in on the fun. And be sure to follow our official TuneCore Spotify playlist!